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Soccer / legends

just-ice
One club Legends
Transfers are a huge part of modern football, but some players don't know what it's like to change teams. Here are the greatest one card players of all time. Francesco Totti. Known as the eighth king of Rome, Francesco Totti stayed loyal to his boyhood club throughout his 24 year career. The attacker made his debut for Roma in 1993 and putting on the shirt for the last time in 2017. In total, he ranked up 786 appearances and scored 307 goals for the Giallorossi. Totti only ever won one city title and he never got his hands on a European trophy. That was because of his commitment to Roma at his peak, Totti could have played for any club in the world, as a matter of fact, he almost joined Real Madrid in 2004 before deciding it'd be too painful to say goodbye to the club of his heart. No matter who plays for Roma in the future. There will never be another Francesco Totti. Ryan Giggs. The class of 92 Were one of the most talented youth teams in football history, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, David Beckham, Gary Neville, Phil Neville, and Nicky Barton all went on to become first team regulars at Manchester United. Giggs was the first one to make his debut than the last one to retire. The Welshman played 963 games for United in a remarkable career. He started out as a speedy tricky winger and later became a thoughtful proving midfielder. Giggs could have left the club in the early 2000s. Juventus and Inter Milan both wanted him but in the end, he decided to stay united by the time he retired in 2014 Giggs had won 13 Premier League titles with one club, it's hard to see anyone ever beating that record. Paolo Maldini At the start of his career Paolo Maldini was mainly known as being the son of Cesare Maldini, a former AC Milan defender and Italy international. Maldini senior played over 400 times for Milan, he was overtaken by his extraordinary son. Between 1985 and 2009 Paolo featured in 902 games for the club. Maldini was a model of consistency throughout his career whether playing at left back right back or centre back, he barely put a foot wrong during his 24 seasons in the first team Maldini won seven Seria A titles and five champions leagues at the San Siro. He never came close to leaving Milan and currently works as the club's technical director. Franco Baresi. One of the greatest center banks the world has ever seen and Franco Baresi also spent his entire career at AC Milan he played alongside Paolo Maldini for a while. Opposition strikers certainly didn't enjoy coming up against the Rosaneri of that era. Baresi first appearance for Milan came in 1978, He was still going strong almost two decades later, before finally hanging up his boobs in 1997. By that time, he'd won virtually everything that was to win at club level, including six Seria A titles and three champions leagues. Tony Adams. Known as Mr. Arsenal by gunners fans, Tony Adams played for the club in three different decades. The centre back joined the youth team in 1980 and made his senior debut three years later aged just 17. By the time he was 21, Adams was a regular starter and the club captain. The Defender won his first league title in the most dramatic of circumstances in 1989, as Arsenal beat Liverpool 2-0 on the final day, Adams won four championships during his career, including 2 under Arsene Wenger, in '98 and 2002. It's difficult to imagine Adams wearing a shirt other than Arsenal's but he could have joined man united in the mid 90s. "Alex Ferguson came in for me, but I wouldn't leave" he said Carlos Puyol Sometimes Puyol looked a little out of place in Pep Guardiola's team of tiki-taka titans but without the rugged defenders passion, grit and determination, Barcelona wouldn't have been as successful as they were. Puyol is an undisputed Barcelona legend, but he almost left the club before he even made his debut. Malaga had an offer for him accepted in 1998 but puyol rejected the move after a former teammate at youth level was promoted to the first team, that teammate was Xavi Hernandez. Puyol played almost 600 games for Barca, he was a six times La Liga champion than a three time Champions League winner, unlike Xavi, Iniesta and Lionel Messi, didn't join another club later in his career. When his contract expired in 2014, the Barcelona Captain simply walked off into the sunset. Jamie Carragher. Jamie Carragher was actually an Everton fan as a kid. He even wore an Everton kit to his Liverpool trial, his loyalties lie in the red half of the city these days though, that's very natural considering he spent his entire 17 year career at Anfield where he won almost everything apart from the Premier League. The top tackling defender played 737 times for Liverpool. He was often overshadowed by Steven Gerrard, another local lad who inspired the club to glory on a regular basis. Now, Gerrard might be the bigger club legend, but his short spell at LA Galaxy means he can't be considered as a one club man. When it comes to those, Jamie Carragher is Liverpool's Number One Paul Scholes. When they were in Manchester United's youth team, Gary Neville thought Paul Scholes would never make it. He was small, so slight. He didn't have great energy. He had no strength. He had asthma, he couldn't really run very far. He wasn't quick, he'd never beat you for pace. Over 700 appearances and 20 major trophies later, it's fair to say Scholes proved Neville wrong. The midfielder spent his entire career at Old Trafford even came out of retirement in 2012 to help the club out. Even at the age of 38, Scholes was still one of the best players at the club. [Totti](https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.eurosport.com/football/francesco-totti-confirms-retirement-and-takes-up-directorship-role-at-roma_sto6256910/story-amp.shtml) [Giggs](https://the18.com/soccer-news/ryan-giggs-assault-charges-two-women?amp) [Maldini](https://images.app.goo.gl/LpfbwtDA4tgT2owY9) [Baresi](https://thesefootballtimes.co/2019/07/24/franco-baresi-the-man-whose-effortless-defending-remains-the-benchmark-almost-three-decades-on/) [Mr Arsenal](https://morethanagame.in/the-enigma-of-tony-adams-a-first-among-equals/) [Puyol](https://images.app.goo.gl/wFaKjirLgqCYE18GA) [Jamie Carragher](https://www.google.com/amp/s/punditarena.com/football/matt-gault/jamie-carragher-top-five-players-1/%3famp) [Source](https://utdreport.co.uk/2020/07/20/paul-scholes-named-greatest-ever-manchester-united-academy-graduate/)
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just-ice
One club Legends
Transfers are a huge part of modern football, but some players don't know what it's like to change teams. Here are the greatest one card players of all time. Francesco Totti. Known as the eighth king of Rome, Francesco Totti stayed loyal to his boyhood club throughout his 24 year career. The attacker made his debut for Roma in 1993 and putting on the shirt for the last time in 2017. In total, he ranked up 786 appearances and scored 307 goals for the Giallorossi. Totti only ever won one city title and he never got his hands on a European trophy. That was because of his commitment to Roma at his peak, Totti could have played for any club in the world, as a matter of fact, he almost joined Real Madrid in 2004 before deciding it'd be too painful to say goodbye to the club of his heart. No matter who plays for Roma in the future. There will never be another Francesco Totti. Ryan Giggs. The class of 92 Were one of the most talented youth teams in football history, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, David Beckham, Gary Neville, Phil Neville, and Nicky Barton all went on to become first team regulars at Manchester United. Giggs was the first one to make his debut than the last one to retire. The Welshman played 963 games for United in a remarkable career. He started out as a speedy tricky winger and later became a thoughtful proving midfielder. Giggs could have left the club in the early 2000s. Juventus and Inter Milan both wanted him but in the end, he decided to stay united by the time he retired in 2014 Giggs had won 13 Premier League titles with one club, it's hard to see anyone ever beating that record. Paolo Maldini At the start of his career Paolo Maldini was mainly known as being the son of Cesare Maldini, a former AC Milan defender and Italy international. Maldini senior played over 400 times for Milan, he was overtaken by his extraordinary son. Between 1985 and 2009 Paolo featured in 902 games for the club. Maldini was a model of consistency throughout his career whether playing at left back right back or centre back, he barely put a foot wrong during his 24 seasons in the first team Maldini won seven Seria A titles and five champions leagues at the San Siro. He never came close to leaving Milan and currently works as the club's technical director. Franco Baresi. One of the greatest center banks the world has ever seen and Franco Baresi also spent his entire career at AC Milan he played alongside Paolo Maldini for a while. Opposition strikers certainly didn't enjoy coming up against the Rosaneri of that era. Baresi first appearance for Milan came in 1978, He was still going strong almost two decades later, before finally hanging up his boobs in 1997. By that time, he'd won virtually everything that was to win at club level, including six Seria A titles and three champions leagues. Tony Adams. Known as Mr. Arsenal by gunners fans, Tony Adams played for the club in three different decades. The centre back joined the youth team in 1980 and made his senior debut three years later aged just 17. By the time he was 21, Adams was a regular starter and the club captain. The Defender won his first league title in the most dramatic of circumstances in 1989, as Arsenal beat Liverpool 2-0 on the final day, Adams won four championships during his career, including 2 under Arsene Wenger, in '98 and 2002. It's difficult to imagine Adams wearing a shirt other than Arsenal's but he could have joined man united in the mid 90s. "Alex Ferguson came in for me, but I wouldn't leave" he said Carlos Puyol Sometimes Puyol looked a little out of place in Pep Guardiola's team of tiki-taka titans but without the rugged defenders passion, grit and determination, Barcelona wouldn't have been as successful as they were. Puyol is an undisputed Barcelona legend, but he almost left the club before he even made his debut. Malaga had an offer for him accepted in 1998 but puyol rejected the move after a former teammate at youth level was promoted to the first team, that teammate was Xavi Hernandez. Puyol played almost 600 games for Barca, he was a six times La Liga champion than a three time Champions League winner, unlike Xavi, Iniesta and Lionel Messi, didn't join another club later in his career. When his contract expired in 2014, the Barcelona Captain simply walked off into the sunset. Jamie Carragher. Jamie Carragher was actually an Everton fan as a kid. He even wore an Everton kit to his Liverpool trial, his loyalties lie in the red half of the city these days though, that's very natural considering he spent his entire 17 year career at Anfield where he won almost everything apart from the Premier League. The top tackling defender played 737 times for Liverpool. He was often overshadowed by Steven Gerrard, another local lad who inspired the club to glory on a regular basis. Now, Gerrard might be the bigger club legend, but his short spell at LA Galaxy means he can't be considered as a one club man. When it comes to those, Jamie Carragher is Liverpool's Number One Paul Scholes. When they were in Manchester United's youth team, Gary Neville thought Paul Scholes would never make it. He was small, so slight. He didn't have great energy. He had no strength. He had asthma, he couldn't really run very far. He wasn't quick, he'd never beat you for pace. Over 700 appearances and 20 major trophies later, it's fair to say Scholes proved Neville wrong. The midfielder spent his entire career at Old Trafford even came out of retirement in 2012 to help the club out. Even at the age of 38, Scholes was still one of the best players at the club. [Totti](https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.eurosport.com/football/francesco-totti-confirms-retirement-and-takes-up-directorship-role-at-roma_sto6256910/story-amp.shtml) [Giggs](https://the18.com/soccer-news/ryan-giggs-assault-charges-two-women?amp) [Maldini](https://images.app.goo.gl/LpfbwtDA4tgT2owY9) [Baresi](https://thesefootballtimes.co/2019/07/24/franco-baresi-the-man-whose-effortless-defending-remains-the-benchmark-almost-three-decades-on/) [Mr Arsenal](https://morethanagame.in/the-enigma-of-tony-adams-a-first-among-equals/) [Puyol](https://images.app.goo.gl/wFaKjirLgqCYE18GA) [Jamie Carragher](https://www.google.com/amp/s/punditarena.com/football/matt-gault/jamie-carragher-top-five-players-1/%3famp) [Source](https://utdreport.co.uk/2020/07/20/paul-scholes-named-greatest-ever-manchester-united-academy-graduate/)
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just-ice
One club Legends
Transfers are a huge part of modern football, but some players don't know what it's like to change teams. Here are the greatest one card players of all time. Francesco Totti. Known as the eighth king of Rome, Francesco Totti stayed loyal to his boyhood club throughout his 24 year career. The attacker made his debut for Roma in 1993 and putting on the shirt for the last time in 2017. In total, he ranked up 786 appearances and scored 307 goals for the Giallorossi. Totti only ever won one city title and he never got his hands on a European trophy. That was because of his commitment to Roma at his peak, Totti could have played for any club in the world, as a matter of fact, he almost joined Real Madrid in 2004 before deciding it'd be too painful to say goodbye to the club of his heart. No matter who plays for Roma in the future. There will never be another Francesco Totti. Ryan Giggs. The class of 92 Were one of the most talented youth teams in football history, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, David Beckham, Gary Neville, Phil Neville, and Nicky Barton all went on to become first team regulars at Manchester United. Giggs was the first one to make his debut than the last one to retire. The Welshman played 963 games for United in a remarkable career. He started out as a speedy tricky winger and later became a thoughtful proving midfielder. Giggs could have left the club in the early 2000s. Juventus and Inter Milan both wanted him but in the end, he decided to stay united by the time he retired in 2014 Giggs had won 13 Premier League titles with one club, it's hard to see anyone ever beating that record. Paolo Maldini At the start of his career Paolo Maldini was mainly known as being the son of Cesare Maldini, a former AC Milan defender and Italy international. Maldini senior played over 400 times for Milan, he was overtaken by his extraordinary son. Between 1985 and 2009 Paolo featured in 902 games for the club. Maldini was a model of consistency throughout his career whether playing at left back right back or centre back, he barely put a foot wrong during his 24 seasons in the first team Maldini won seven Seria A titles and five champions leagues at the San Siro. He never came close to leaving Milan and currently works as the club's technical director. Franco Baresi. One of the greatest center banks the world has ever seen and Franco Baresi also spent his entire career at AC Milan he played alongside Paolo Maldini for a while. Opposition strikers certainly didn't enjoy coming up against the Rosaneri of that era. Baresi first appearance for Milan came in 1978, He was still going strong almost two decades later, before finally hanging up his boobs in 1997. By that time, he'd won virtually everything that was to win at club level, including six Seria A titles and three champions leagues. Tony Adams. Known as Mr. Arsenal by gunners fans, Tony Adams played for the club in three different decades. The centre back joined the youth team in 1980 and made his senior debut three years later aged just 17. By the time he was 21, Adams was a regular starter and the club captain. The Defender won his first league title in the most dramatic of circumstances in 1989, as Arsenal beat Liverpool 2-0 on the final day, Adams won four championships during his career, including 2 under Arsene Wenger, in '98 and 2002. It's difficult to imagine Adams wearing a shirt other than Arsenal's but he could have joined man united in the mid 90s. "Alex Ferguson came in for me, but I wouldn't leave" he said Carlos Puyol Sometimes Puyol looked a little out of place in Pep Guardiola's team of tiki-taka titans but without the rugged defenders passion, grit and determination, Barcelona wouldn't have been as successful as they were. Puyol is an undisputed Barcelona legend, but he almost left the club before he even made his debut. Malaga had an offer for him accepted in 1998 but puyol rejected the move after a former teammate at youth level was promoted to the first team, that teammate was Xavi Hernandez. Puyol played almost 600 games for Barca, he was a six times La Liga champion than a three time Champions League winner, unlike Xavi, Iniesta and Lionel Messi, didn't join another club later in his career. When his contract expired in 2014, the Barcelona Captain simply walked off into the sunset. Jamie Carragher. Jamie Carragher was actually an Everton fan as a kid. He even wore an Everton kit to his Liverpool trial, his loyalties lie in the red half of the city these days though, that's very natural considering he spent his entire 17 year career at Anfield where he won almost everything apart from the Premier League. The top tackling defender played 737 times for Liverpool. He was often overshadowed by Steven Gerrard, another local lad who inspired the club to glory on a regular basis. Now, Gerrard might be the bigger club legend, but his short spell at LA Galaxy means he can't be considered as a one club man. When it comes to those, Jamie Carragher is Liverpool's Number One Paul Scholes. When they were in Manchester United's youth team, Gary Neville thought Paul Scholes would never make it. He was small, so slight. He didn't have great energy. He had no strength. He had asthma, he couldn't really run very far. He wasn't quick, he'd never beat you for pace. Over 700 appearances and 20 major trophies later, it's fair to say Scholes proved Neville wrong. The midfielder spent his entire career at Old Trafford even came out of retirement in 2012 to help the club out. Even at the age of 38, Scholes was still one of the best players at the club. [Totti](https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.eurosport.com/football/francesco-totti-confirms-retirement-and-takes-up-directorship-role-at-roma_sto6256910/story-amp.shtml) [Giggs](https://the18.com/soccer-news/ryan-giggs-assault-charges-two-women?amp) [Maldini](https://images.app.goo.gl/LpfbwtDA4tgT2owY9) [Baresi](https://thesefootballtimes.co/2019/07/24/franco-baresi-the-man-whose-effortless-defending-remains-the-benchmark-almost-three-decades-on/) [Mr Arsenal](https://morethanagame.in/the-enigma-of-tony-adams-a-first-among-equals/) [Puyol](https://images.app.goo.gl/wFaKjirLgqCYE18GA) [Jamie Carragher](https://www.google.com/amp/s/punditarena.com/football/matt-gault/jamie-carragher-top-five-players-1/%3famp) [Source](https://utdreport.co.uk/2020/07/20/paul-scholes-named-greatest-ever-manchester-united-academy-graduate/)
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tobechi74
Why Do Soccer players Fail at their first coaching Job
Paul Clement began to help soccer players as a Physical education teacher at the age of twenty-three. He was so effectiv in the job that he was asked to coach Fulham youth team. Chelsea snapped him up to work in their academy and finally promoted him as an assistant manager under Carlos Ancelotti. The duo did well together that the Italian manager took him to be his assistant at Paris St German, Real Madrid and Bayern Munich. The duo won the UEFA champion league as well as other trophy. Trouble began to kick in when derby and Swansea appointed him manager. Clement performed woefully that one began to doubt his coaching ability. What would make a wonderful assistant manager perform poorly as a manager? Peters principle gives us a clue. A person is promoted due to their success in the previous job until he is no longer competent in their new job as a result of lacking the skill needed. Many exceptional teachers perform very well as vice principal but when they are made the principal of the school, their performance drops. He begins to spend more time in the office appending signatures to files as well as attending to meetings upon meeting and less time in the classroom. The role of a youth coach differs from that of a club manager. The former is responsible for the Athlete whereas the latter is responsible for the club management. A youth coach is successful when he transforms a mediocre player into a superstar. He instills the needed skill to the player to improve his performance. A team manager is successful when he wins matches and take home the trophy. To promote an assistant manager to a main manager comes with extra responsibility for which the individual may not possess The youth team coach enjoys bringing out the hidden potential of a young athlete. The fact that he did well there was because he loves the work more than he loves to win. Not everyone loves competition. Not everyone is well suited to the fame and power that comes with taking the lead role. Some individuals are better off helping from the background. Both positions come with different skills. Unless the coach has the new ability needed, he is destined for failure. This begs the question. If a youth coach is offered an opportunity to manage a club which he knows he lacks the ability to perform at that time, should he reject the offer? The first factor is the individual perception and reaction to failure. Employee who perceive failure as a terrible thing hate being sacked. One who dreads to fail is better off in his comfort zone. Job security is Paramount to such an individual. When a team fails, the fans blame the team chief manager. . The chief responsibility of facing the media falls on the head. The backroom staff are overlooked. Such a person should first change his mindset on failure before he can accept such an offer. Failing to step up counts as failure. Real failure comes from inability to learn from one's mistakes. He should see the offer as an opportunity to gain new experiences and meet more people in the sport sector. He should understand that all great coaches failed one time or another but learned in the process. Every failed match is an opportunity to reflect on the likely reason and improve his knowledge. The second factor depends on the individual ability to embrace the change that comes with learning. Slow learners are better off rejecting that offer as they are unable to deal with the immediate complexity that comes with the new role. Fast learners should take the job while asking for help from experienced persons outside the organization. For instance, he may choose a more experienced assistant manager. He should not hesitate to engage in additional training in that new skill which he lacks. Club owners are unreasonably optimistic. A club legend does not necessarily make a great coach. Diego Maradona is a typical example. A good sergeant may make a bad captain or a worse general. One may be good at obeying order but terrible at knowing the best circumstance to give such order.
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tobechi74
Why Do Soccer players Fail at their first coaching Job
Paul Clement began to help soccer players as a Physical education teacher at the age of twenty-three. He was so effectiv in the job that he was asked to coach Fulham youth team. Chelsea snapped him up to work in their academy and finally promoted him as an assistant manager under Carlos Ancelotti. The duo did well together that the Italian manager took him to be his assistant at Paris St German, Real Madrid and Bayern Munich. The duo won the UEFA champion league as well as other trophy. Trouble began to kick in when derby and Swansea appointed him manager. Clement performed woefully that one began to doubt his coaching ability. What would make a wonderful assistant manager perform poorly as a manager? Peters principle gives us a clue. A person is promoted due to their success in the previous job until he is no longer competent in their new job as a result of lacking the skill needed. Many exceptional teachers perform very well as vice principal but when they are made the principal of the school, their performance drops. He begins to spend more time in the office appending signatures to files as well as attending to meetings upon meeting and less time in the classroom. The role of a youth coach differs from that of a club manager. The former is responsible for the Athlete whereas the latter is responsible for the club management. A youth coach is successful when he transforms a mediocre player into a superstar. He instills the needed skill to the player to improve his performance. A team manager is successful when he wins matches and take home the trophy. To promote an assistant manager to a main manager comes with extra responsibility for which the individual may not possess The youth team coach enjoys bringing out the hidden potential of a young athlete. The fact that he did well there was because he loves the work more than he loves to win. Not everyone loves competition. Not everyone is well suited to the fame and power that comes with taking the lead role. Some individuals are better off helping from the background. Both positions come with different skills. Unless the coach has the new ability needed, he is destined for failure. This begs the question. If a youth coach is offered an opportunity to manage a club which he knows he lacks the ability to perform at that time, should he reject the offer? The first factor is the individual perception and reaction to failure. Employee who perceive failure as a terrible thing hate being sacked. One who dreads to fail is better off in his comfort zone. Job security is Paramount to such an individual. When a team fails, the fans blame the team chief manager. . The chief responsibility of facing the media falls on the head. The backroom staff are overlooked. Such a person should first change his mindset on failure before he can accept such an offer. Failing to step up counts as failure. Real failure comes from inability to learn from one's mistakes. He should see the offer as an opportunity to gain new experiences and meet more people in the sport sector. He should understand that all great coaches failed one time or another but learned in the process. Every failed match is an opportunity to reflect on the likely reason and improve his knowledge. The second factor depends on the individual ability to embrace the change that comes with learning. Slow learners are better off rejecting that offer as they are unable to deal with the immediate complexity that comes with the new role. Fast learners should take the job while asking for help from experienced persons outside the organization. For instance, he may choose a more experienced assistant manager. He should not hesitate to engage in additional training in that new skill which he lacks. Club owners are unreasonably optimistic. A club legend does not necessarily make a great coach. Diego Maradona is a typical example. A good sergeant may make a bad captain or a worse general. One may be good at obeying order but terrible at knowing the best circumstance to give such order.
0.00
11
3
tobechi74
Why Do Soccer players Fail at their first coaching Job
Paul Clement began to help soccer players as a Physical education teacher at the age of twenty-three. He was so effectiv in the job that he was asked to coach Fulham youth team. Chelsea snapped him up to work in their academy and finally promoted him as an assistant manager under Carlos Ancelotti. The duo did well together that the Italian manager took him to be his assistant at Paris St German, Real Madrid and Bayern Munich. The duo won the UEFA champion league as well as other trophy. Trouble began to kick in when derby and Swansea appointed him manager. Clement performed woefully that one began to doubt his coaching ability. What would make a wonderful assistant manager perform poorly as a manager? Peters principle gives us a clue. A person is promoted due to their success in the previous job until he is no longer competent in their new job as a result of lacking the skill needed. Many exceptional teachers perform very well as vice principal but when they are made the principal of the school, their performance drops. He begins to spend more time in the office appending signatures to files as well as attending to meetings upon meeting and less time in the classroom. The role of a youth coach differs from that of a club manager. The former is responsible for the Athlete whereas the latter is responsible for the club management. A youth coach is successful when he transforms a mediocre player into a superstar. He instills the needed skill to the player to improve his performance. A team manager is successful when he wins matches and take home the trophy. To promote an assistant manager to a main manager comes with extra responsibility for which the individual may not possess The youth team coach enjoys bringing out the hidden potential of a young athlete. The fact that he did well there was because he loves the work more than he loves to win. Not everyone loves competition. Not everyone is well suited to the fame and power that comes with taking the lead role. Some individuals are better off helping from the background. Both positions come with different skills. Unless the coach has the new ability needed, he is destined for failure. This begs the question. If a youth coach is offered an opportunity to manage a club which he knows he lacks the ability to perform at that time, should he reject the offer? The first factor is the individual perception and reaction to failure. Employee who perceive failure as a terrible thing hate being sacked. One who dreads to fail is better off in his comfort zone. Job security is Paramount to such an individual. When a team fails, the fans blame the team chief manager. . The chief responsibility of facing the media falls on the head. The backroom staff are overlooked. Such a person should first change his mindset on failure before he can accept such an offer. Failing to step up counts as failure. Real failure comes from inability to learn from one's mistakes. He should see the offer as an opportunity to gain new experiences and meet more people in the sport sector. He should understand that all great coaches failed one time or another but learned in the process. Every failed match is an opportunity to reflect on the likely reason and improve his knowledge. The second factor depends on the individual ability to embrace the change that comes with learning. Slow learners are better off rejecting that offer as they are unable to deal with the immediate complexity that comes with the new role. Fast learners should take the job while asking for help from experienced persons outside the organization. For instance, he may choose a more experienced assistant manager. He should not hesitate to engage in additional training in that new skill which he lacks. Club owners are unreasonably optimistic. A club legend does not necessarily make a great coach. Diego Maradona is a typical example. A good sergeant may make a bad captain or a worse general. One may be good at obeying order but terrible at knowing the best circumstance to give such order.
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